Texas 2022 midterm election candidates

Gun Rights

2022 Texas Midterm Elections

The 2022 Texas midterm elections are right around the corner, with early voting ending November 4 and the general election being held on November 8. While midterm elections often have lower voting turnout rates than presidential election years, they are just as important. Many state and local elections often take place on the same day, meaning that altogether, they have the potential to turn an entire array of government offices for a constituency.

Races

Governor

You Might Like

Greg Abbott (R)

  • Gun Safety
    • “Greg Abbott believes the right to keep and bear arms was settled in 1791 when the 2nd Amendment was adopted to the U.S. Constitution. On behalf of 31 states, Greg Abbott championed a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision (District of Columbia v. Heller) that struck down a handgun ban and protected an individual’s right to bear arms while he was Texas’ Attorney General. He was also one of the first Attorneys General in America to challenge the Obama Administration’s efforts to use the United Nations to regulate guns in the United States. As Governor, Greg Abbott expanded 2nd Amendment rights, signing into law “campus carry” and “open carry.” As an avid hunter and member of the Texas State Rifle Association and National Rifle Association, Greg Abbott will continue to fight any federal government overreach that aims to disrupt the 2nd Amendment rights of law-abiding Texans.”
  • Immigration
    • “Greg Abbott signed legislation requiring state agencies to participate in E-Verify to ensure state money goes only to those eligible to work in the United States. Greg Abbott knows that for you to be truly free—for you to succeed at work, or at school, or as a parent—you need to feel secure. To fight the drug cartels and human traffickers from importing crime into Texas, Greg Abbott signed the toughest border security law of any state.”
  • Abortion/Women’s Rights
    • “Since Greg Abbott took office as Governor, he has made great strides to protect life, but must also do more to protect our vulnerable unborn children. Texas ended the barbaric practice of selling baby body parts for profit. Texas increased funding for adoption services. And Texas banned partial birth abortions. But more must be done to defend the culture of life in Texas. Greg Abbott wants to prevent cities and counties from using your tax dollars to fund abortions.”

Beto O’Rourke (D)

  • Gun Safety
    • “As governor, I will fight for bipartisan, commonsense gun safety measures that the majority of Texans agree on, like raising the minimum age to purchase an assault rifle to 21, implementing universal background checks, and establishing a red flag law system.”
  • Immigration
    • “The state government should provide local communities the support they need to respond to migration flows at the border in a safe and orderly fashion. That can include support for migrant processing, shelter, and transportation—as long as it is done in a way that reflects our values, upholds U.S. asylum laws, and refrains from wasting taxpayer dollars on political stunts instead of solutions.”
  • Abortion
    • “I will fight to repeal Texas’ extreme abortion laws that endanger the lives of women and make no exception for rape or incest. I will also strengthen investments in women’s health and family planning programs to increase access to contraception and cancer screenings, and combat Texas’ maternal mortality crisis by expanding Medicaid and increasing pregnancy Medicaid to one-year postpartum.”

Mark Tippets (Lib)

  • Gun Safety
    • “To meet Texans’ security and education preferences, I support a school choice system so all Texans can afford to send their children to private, public, or home school. Cut taxes and government spending to create a more vibrant economy that draws people away from criminal activity. Curb drug war-related violence by legalizing marijuana.”
  • Immigration
    • “It’s nearly impossible to immigrate to America legally. We could end most illegal immigration by enacting a good comprehensive immigration policy, making it easier for honest, hardworking people to come work and live here legally. Reform requires federal action. Instead of seeing foreigners as a problem, we should welcome them as potential friends, business partners, and customers.”
  • Abortion
    • “Recognizing that abortion is a sensitive issue, and that people can hold good-faith views on all sides, I believe that government should be kept out of the matter, leaving the question to each person for their conscientious consideration. A group of mostly men legislators should not be able to tell my daughters what they can and can’t do with their bodies.”

Delilah Barrios (Green)

  • Gun Safety
    • “Retailers must limit the amount and frequency of sales of guns and ammunition. The police budget should be limited as well and resources should go towards housing, childcare, education, gardens, transportation etc. I am a supporter of community police because the police criminalize poverty and mental health.”
  • Immigration
    • “The role of our state is to be good neighbors. To have compassion and offer opportunities both here and in Mexico. We rely heavily on the exploitation of the global south. I would like to see Texas make amends and speed up the immigration process while also supporting Mexico’s economy as well. A sustainable partnership would be ideal.”
  • Abortion
    • “Statewide single payer would eliminate the insurance companies ability to cause harm to patients. I would enact a law that would provide protection to patients and providers. Anyone deliberately interfering with patient care due to religious or other will face a 50k+ fine plus jail. This is only a short term solution while we set up statewide single payer and better patient rights for autonomy.”

Lieutenant Governor

Dan Patrick (R)

  • Gun Safety
    • “I believe gun transfers between family members should continue to be allowed without a background check. What I am proposing is that anyone who wants to sell a gun to a stranger simply go to a gun store and fill out the background check form.  Then the gun can be exchanged and the deal is closed. This is NOT a ban on private gun sales and this change in the law will NOT lead to a gun registry. That is utter nonsense. I don’t support banning private gun sales or a national registry, and I never will.  I am sorry that some of my allies in the battle to protect our Second Amendment rights are angry about this — but as I say in this Fox clip, the National Rifle Association is just wrong on this.  Their refusal to compromise on this issue will only hurt our long-term defense of the Second Amendment.”
  • Abortion
    • “Texas has already taken decisive action on this issue. Not only did the Texas Legislature pass the Heartbeat Bill that has already saved thousands of innocent babies since becoming law last September, we also passed the Trigger Bill, which I made a top priority last session. We are steadfastly a pro-life state and have made tremendous efforts to support women in their decision to choose life. I have led the charge to more than double funding for our Alternatives to Abortion program, which provides services to women who choose life. We will also continue to strengthen adoption programs in Texas and support families who welcome adopted children into their loving homes. Texas has led the way to protect innocent life in the womb, and we will continue to do so moving forward in the Texas Senate.”
  • Economy
    • “I have always believed returning money back to taxpayers does not grow government. Every member of the Texas Senate will have ideas on how this additional revenue should be spent and I will give them full consideration. However, I believe, first and foremost, any surplus should first go back to the taxpayers of Texas. Texas homeowners must receive tax relief before we commit to any new spending. Of course we must continue to maintain our effort to secure the border where the federal government has failed. I still have concerns about a national recession but the Texas economy will always lead the nation with our conservative approach to spending and putting taxpayers first. This unprecedented windfall due to the hard work of Texas taxpayers and our growing economy will give us the funding we need to weather any future economic storm that the Nation may face.”

Mike Collier (D)

  • Gun Safety
    • “I will work with community leaders and law enforcement to raise the age to purchase a firearm to 21, universal background checks, safe storage requirements, and a waiting period to buy a semi-automatic firearms.These actions must be undertaken before the start of the next school year because the time to stop the next school shooting is now.”
  • Abortion
    • “As Lt. Governor, I will work to codify the protections of Roe v. Wade into the books of law—returning the power to make decisions to doctors and their patients, as well as invest in pre-natal and maternal healthcare for women across Texas.”
  • Economy
    • “Over the last eight years, Texans have faced skyrocketing property taxes. Thanks to tax loopholes, Texans are paying more so that corporations can pay less. I will close those loopholes in order to bring down taxes for folks across the state and make corporations pay their fair share.”

Shanna Steele (Lib)

  • Gun Safety
    • “I support the Second Amendment. Ending the war on drugs, treating addiction, and improving economic conditions would curb gun violence.”
  • Abortion
    • “I would remove state government from healthcare decisions that should be made between doctors and their patients. In addition, I would like to make the adoption process easier for those who choose adoption over abortion.”
  • Economy
    • “Legalizing marijuana and eliminating property taxes would be a good start to increasing the GDP and improve the economic challenges faced by Texans.”

Attorney General

Ken Paxton (R)

  • Immigration
    • “As Attorney General, I am making it a top priority to work with the Department of Public Safety, local law enforcement officials, and the executive cabinet to determine the strategic needs to secure our international border and how to achieve our goals for border security to protect Texans. I am also working to achieve operational control of our border. I oppose amnesty and while in the Legislature voted to prohibit sanctuary cities, filed bills to stop illegal immigrants from receiving in-state tuition, and voted against providing driver’s licenses to illegal immigrants.”
  • Government involvement in Healthcare
    • “As Attorney General, I am working to promote a culture of life in Texas, and ensure that laws passed by the legislature to protect the lives of unborn children are fully implemented and legally protected.”

Rochelle Mercedes Garza (D)

  • Immigration
    • “Immigration enforcement falls under federal jurisdiction. As an immigration attorney and border native, I understand the complexities of our immigration system. I have litigated against bad policies that have created a humanitarian crisis at the border. Texas’ enforcement efforts at the border are unconstitutional, wasteful and only worsen the issue.”
  • Government involvement in Healthcare
    • “As a parent, I am deeply committed to ensuring the office of the Attorney General protects all Texans. Decisions about the health of children are extremely personal, and should only be made between parents, physicians and the child, when appropriate. Politicians have no place in the decision-making process about a child’s medical treatment.”

Comptroller of Public Accounts

Glenn Hegar (R)

  • Taxes
    • “Funding public schools in Texas has been a shared burden split between state funds and local property taxes. Until recently the local share was allowed to grow unchecked creating increased pressure on local property taxes. I helped compress local property tax rates and rebalance the burden between state funds and local taxpayers. Our strong economic recovery now puts us in position to do more.”
  • Top Priorities
    • “I will continue to focus on the core constitutional duties of my office and that means maintaining my attention on the Texas economy. Navigating the last few years has been difficult, but I have always remained focused on the trends, challenges and opportunities in our state economy. We must fight to keep Texas a place where freedom creates new opportunities for families and businesses to thrive.”

Janet Dudding (D)

  • Taxes for education funding
    • “Find new revenue for Charter & 313. Texas Legislature added $6.5 billion dollars in funding to public schools in 2019. Yet per a 2021 SPLC report, Texas currently ranks 40th in the nation. New rev streams are needed. Legalizing adult-use cannabis could bring $1 billion in tax revenue (and decriminalization could save $300 million). Look at “green” taxes to build revenue streams from green energy.”
  • Top Priorities
    • “Statute defines Comptroller as state’s ‘sole’ accountant. We’ve never had a CPA as our Comptroller. I will be the watchdog over tax dollars, answerable to Texans not special interests. As a hurricane survivor, climate-disasters are personal to me and I will work to mitigate the root cause as well as our risk exposure through SECO. Expand broadband by partnering with local govt utilities & coops.

V. Alonzo Echevarria-Garza (Lib)

  • Taxes for education funding
    • “I don’t believe there is, strictly speaking, a proper balance that policy makers should adhere to, or fix to fairly fund state government or public schools. The question is not the balance amounts, but what mechanisms are in place to adapt.”
  • Top Priorities
    • “The highest priority is to implement policies that may improve operations, optimize benefits, and offer flexibility in dealing with financial challenges. These policies will not only improve conditions in four year, but beyond my own term in office.”

Commissioner of General Land Office

Dawn Buckingham (R)

  • Federal Fund Allocations
    • “I grew up in a small town along the Texas coast, so I know firsthand just how devastating a major hurricane can be and what people need in its aftermath. As Land Commissioner, I’ll make sure the GLO is fully prepared to respond to catastrophic storms that impact our coast.”
  • Coastal Planning
    • “Our coastal communities deserve a Land Commissioner that is as tough and resilient as they are. As a state senator, I am proud to have supported measures to fund flood mitigation, prepare for construction of a coastal spine, and more. Investing in coastal infrastructure to mitigate the effects of hurricanes is just smart. We can save lives and protect property with these investments.”

Jay Kleberg (D)

  • Federal Fund Allocations
    • “Centering the voices of communities most impacted by natural disasters and least-supported by our government is a priority for my campaign and will continue to be a priority for me as commissioner. As Land Commissioner, I will emphasize the reformation of disaster relief and recovery programs at the General Land Office. This will ensure Texans most affected have the proper funding.”
  • Coastal Planning
    • “An example of measures I support is the nearly $30 billion investment in protection measures for the Texas Gulf Coast, including a coastal storm barrier in Galveston and beach restoration efforts on South Padre Island. As Land Commissioner, I would prioritize projects like these and work with all stakeholders to secure funding for these projects and other disaster mitigation and recovery efforts.”

Alfred Molison (Green)

  • Federal Fund Allocations
    • “When elected, I’ll conduct an administrative review of disaster relief best practices, before potential events and afterwards to see how well we helped Texans and how we can improve. With public participation, a data driven approach can help us get relief to those who need it most, quickly, efficiently, and fairly. A disaster doesn’t care what walk of life you come from.”
  • Coastal Planning
    • “Storm barriers may be key in providing protection of our major living spaces along the coastline. When elected I’ll leverage the power to the Land Commissioner to see what works, what’s practical, and what’s feasible. This will be a huge undertaking. But as in much of life it’s a matter of paying a small, preventive amount now or a catastrophic amount later. All such planning requires the decision-making input of the public.”

Commissioner of Agriculture

Sid Miller (R)

  • Water resources
    • “Without water, there is no agriculture. Without water, there is no economy. Without water, there is no life. Water is the most essential substance in the world and Texas is running out of it! The Great Texas Water Plan is Sid Miller’s response. In his next term, Commissioner Miller will be focused on educating and advocating for a water “moon shot.”
  • Agriculture diversity
    • “Sid Miller is the first statewide elected Republican leader to advocate for a robust, patient-centric approach to cannabis. During the pandemic, Sid Miller took aggressive action to make it easier to get domestic and imported goods – from central American fruits to toilet paper – onto Texas grocery shelves. He continues this work to assure that Americans never again face shortages of essential goods.”

Susan Hays (D)

  • Water resources
    • “The Republicans have failed to even try to solve this problem. The Department of Agriculture (TDA) can research & promote sustainable practices and less-thirsty crops, but must work across agencies such as the Land Office, the Water Development Board, local water districts, & others, and with the Legislature for a comprehensive state plan to protect water quality and supply.”
  • Agriculture diversity
    • “As a cannabis attorney I understand the best way to legalize & regulate to protect public health & safety giving Texans an opportunity to share in the economic opportunity. Texas ag can flourish by growing more fruits, vegetables & high-value crops. California produces more than 70% of U.S. fruits and vegetables — too many eggs in one basket. We need to diversify & support small operators.”

Railroad Commissioner

Wayne Christian (R)

  • Methane Emissions
    • “Oil and gas production and a clean environment are not mutually exclusive; the six-major pollutants regulated by the EPA have decreased by 77% over the last 50 years. The current Administration’s methane rule and natural gas tax could shut down oil and gas production in Texas which would kill jobs, harm our economy, increase costs to consumers, and reduce the reliability of our grid.”
  • Power/Electricity
    • “During Winter Storm Uri, wind generated less than 6% of our electricity despite averaging 23% during 2020. Natural gas generated 67% of our electricity during the storm despite averaging only 46% in 2020. The RRC has designated natural gas facilities as critical during energy emergencies and put in place weatherization requirements to ensure even better performance in future.”

Luke Warford (D)

  • Methane Emissions
    • “Methane emissions play a large role in climate change, and the Railroad Commission has a tremendous capacity to address climate change by reducing methane emissions while strengthening the Texas economy. I will accomplish this by enforcing existing regulations, limiting the number of flaring exemptions the Commission grants, identifying and plugging methane leaks, and capping orphaned wells.”
  • Power/Electricity
    • “Strengthening our energy infrastructure is my number one priority because it is unconscionable that Texans have to live in fear that their power will go out the next time it gets cold. I will establish a clear, substantive, and enforceable weatherization standard, identify critical gas producers, and ensure preparations for the next major storm are actually completed.”

Jaime Andres Díez (Lib)

  • Methane Emissions
    • “Reducing methane is the most effective strategy for dealing with climate change. Imposing restriction on flaring will reduce methane in TX, but will increase overall methane emission. Flaring/barrel in TX is amongst the lowest in the world. Flaring restrictions will cause forced closure of wells and increases in foreign (less-green) extraction.”
  • Power/Electricity
    • “The RRC has taken good steps to fix issues concerning critical infrastructures designations with ERCOT and weatherization requirements. However, there continues to be issues with data management, transparency, and with outlining how they will deal with repeat non-compliance. Regarding repeat weatherization non-compliance, I think the RRC should consider waiving the maximum fine of $1 million.”

Hunter Wayne Crow (Green)

  • Methane Emissions
    • “Methane is the second most abundant anthropogenic GHG after carbon dioxide (CO2), accounting for about 20 percent of global emissions. Methane is more than 25 times as potent as carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere. I will support the enactment of bans on hydraulic fracturing for natural gas and oil on the local, state and federal level and also ensure not further damage occurs.”
  • Power/Electricity
    • “I would recommend that we invest taxpayers money toward the development of Renewable Energy Technology such as wind, solar, geothermal, conservation and small-scale hydroelectric. Once we have one or more of these methods fully utilized. We would be able to supply a vast amount of energy that would able to resolve the State of Texas current energy demands.”

Justice, Texas Supreme Court Place 3

Debra Lehrmann (R)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “If justice is denied to one individual, it is denied to all. During my tenure on the Court, we have made great progress in improving access to justice for all persons, regardless of financial means. We have devoted much time & effort towards increasing public & private support for expanded representation of underprivileged Texans. Proud of these efforts, I intend to expand upon this work.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “Regardless of the subject matter, enforcing the rule of law in a consistent, scholarly, methodical, impartial & fair manner is of utmost importance. As the overseer of the 3rd branch of government, the Court must also ensure that rules governing our court system, and members of the Bar & Judiciary, serve the public in an efficient and just manner. These Court responsibilities are essential.”

Erin A. Nowell (D)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “First, we need to increase the individuals in the pipeline who are available and willing to assist those in underrepresented communities – in every level of the judicial system. We also need to support (with both work and money) programs and initiatives that seek to provide equal justice access for all.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “The U.S. Supreme Court has increasingly divested itself of jurisdiction over issues it has determined belong to the individual states. Examples include gerrymandering, voting rights, and a woman’s right to bodily autonomy. Accordingly, these issues will continue to arise within our state courts. As new laws are passed, interpreted, and even contested, the Texas Supreme Court will be the forum.”

Thomas Edward Oxford (Lib)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “We must continue to support and improve the IOLTA program and the pro bono efforts of the local bar associations.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “The Jury system has been under attack in Texas for years. Powerful special interest groups have funded judges who believe they are in a better position than juries to decide questions of fact. We must continue to push for a system in which judges decide questions of law and juries decide questions of fact.”

Justice, Texas Supreme Court Place 5

Rebecca Huddle (R)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “The Court’s Access to Justice Commission works to expand access to free legal services. More lawyers should volunteer pro bono (free) representation of poor Texans, and courts should encourage and recognize lawyers who do. Technology can also help. The Supreme Court now permits Zoom hearings in routine hearings, so Texans can participate in court proceedings without missing a day of work.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “Court backlogs are a pressing issue in some big-city trial courts. If criminal judges don’t move dockets, dangerous offenders roam the streets instead of facing punishment. If civil judges don’t move dockets, Texas families and businesses wait too long for resolution. I believe Texas judges must always be accountable to the people and dispose of cases responsibly, but as promptly as possible.”

Amanda Reichek (D)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “Increased access to pro bono services, more funding and resources available for legal aid organizations, simplifying the filing process, and removing other artificial barriers to accessing the legal system.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “A slew of ‘hot button’ issues that implicate some of our most basic liberties which counsels quick resolution, but at the same time are emotionally-charged and complicated.”

Justice, Texas Supreme Court Place 9

Evan Young (R)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “Ensuring open courts is fundamental to public confidence in our judiciary and to protecting individual rights. The Access to Justice Commission, Texas Legislature, and Texas Supreme Court have made great progress in marshaling public and private support and resources for expanded representation of underprivileged Texans and making judicial proceedings more efficient, comprehensible, and fair.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “Among its most pressing work, the Supreme Court must ensure, even in times of crisis, and without fear or favor, that the U.S. and Texas Constitutions’ limits are respected—the lines between different branches of government, between the state and local governments, and between government power and individual liberty. The Court must make sure that the law is followed, wholly aside from politics.”

Julia Maldonado (D)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “Increase funds for nonprofits who provide services for low-income Texans, ensure that there are educational materials in different languages regarding the court processes. Motivate big firms to provide pro bono services and create partnerships with law schools so that law students can hone their skills while providing much needed legal help under the supervision of their professors.”
  • Most pressing issues
    • “Equity and access to justice are two of the most pressing issues. We have to ensure that the rights of every Texan are protected and that everyone, regardless of their socio-economic status, has access to justice. The justices have to ensure that Texans feel confident with the Court’s actions at all times.”

Judge, Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Place 5

Scott Walker (R)

  • Judicial Philosophy
    • “According to Judge Walker, ‘the role of the judiciary is to uphold the law and sometimes interpret ambiguities in the law, but not make the law.’ Judge Walker also asserts that ‘lawmaking is solely the role of the legislature.’”
  • Ensuring Equity
    • “As an appellate judge, Judge Scott Walker always adheres to the Constitution.  He strives to ensure that all parties receive a fair and just review of all cases heard at the Court of Criminal Appeals.”

Dana Huffman (D)

  • Judicial Philosophy
    • “To see that justice is done.”
  • Ensuring Equity
    • “We need to guarantee more access to pro bono representation as well as access to language lines that cover all languages at every proceeding.”

Judge, Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Place 6

Jesse F. McClure III (R)

  • Judicial Philosophy
    • “I follow the text of the constitutional provision or statute in question. It is rarely, if ever, proper for a judge to depart from the plain, original public meaning of the text. When dealing with “non-textual” issues, I strive to bring common sense to my decision making, always keeping in mind that vindicating the rights of the citizen is paramount.”
  • Ensuring Equity
    • “In the criminal justice system, indigent defendants at the trial court level are appointed counsel, and we need to ensure that such counsel are competent, fairly compensated, and have reasonable caseloads. In the civil system, other states have experimented with allowing non-lawyers to handle certain matters – an innovation worth evaluating to allow greater access to Texas courts.”

Robert Johnson (D)

  • Judicial Philosophy
    • “My judicial philosophy can be summed up in three words: Less is more. The less a judge attempts to impose his or her will on judicial decision making the more consistent our application of the law will be. Ultimately, this job is not about me or my opponent. This job is about you and all of our fellow Texans. I will remain focused on upholding the letter and spirit of the law as it is written.”
  • Ensuring Equity
    • “I believe our State Bar has set high standards for the representation of indigent and underserved persons/ communities, but we can do more. We should incentivize pro bono legal services for large law firms by providing discounted bar dues and continuing legal education fees for those who show a set minimum number of indigent defense hours. Our justice system is only as fair as it is perceived.”

State Board of Education, District 11

Patricia Hardy (R)

  • Charter Schools
    • “There is a great deal of debate about the drain that charter schools have on the regular public schools. Logic would tell you there is some drain causing me to be very selective as to which charters I support. When charters provide a unique reason for their existence such as a recent one specializing in Autism or providing a choice in an area where there are only failing schools I will support it.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “The most pressing issue at this time is the adding the civics requirements called for in SB3 into our current SS TEKS. The reviewing of upcoming legislation and possible effects on Texas public schools is time sensitive. Two ongoing responsibilities are assuring quality instructional materials aligned to our standards and reviewing of charter school applications.”

Luis Miguel Sifuentes (D)

  • Charter Schools
    • “Because funding is based on student enrollment, as students move from public schools to charter schools, they take their student allotment with them at a time when our public schools need funding the most. Public schools are the backbone of our communities. I would advocate for equitable, fair and transparent funding of our schools.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “The SBOE should work to ensure that they are transparent in their decision making while getting feedback from its customers: educators, parents, and students. I will work to ensure that the voices of parents, educators, and students are solicited and acted upon.”

State Board of Education, District 13

Kathryn Monette (R)

  • Charter Schools
    • “I don’t think there is a financial impact taken away from local public schools. They receive less per child and it is up to the charter school to secure a building for teaching. Charter schools don’t receive funds from local tax revenue, but they do receive private donations. Charter schools offer families a choice in education and provide other options for students.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “Education needs to be about teaching the core subjects of math, English, writing, science, music, reading, history and geography. All the social emotional learning of the day should be left to parents to teach instead of the schools. Teach character and respect for others instead. No sex ed under 6th grade of any kind in school. Parental rights and transparency of all teaching materials.”

Aicha Davis (D)

  • Charter Schools
    • “Please see my recent OpEd in the Fort Worth Telegram, titled ‘Charter schools’ growth need review as it costs TX districts,’ discussing the funding impact for local ISDs.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “The SBOE has the responsibility of reviewing resources districts may adopt to accompany TEKS. The process has become extremely politicized, leading to the denial of any resources for elementary health TEKS last year. After the current social studies review, the SBOE will have to review new resources. Previous history books had inaccurate language and did not fairly represent women or minorities.

State Board of Education, District 14

Evelyn Brooks (R)

  • Charter Schools
    • “The level of impact independent charter schools have on the funding for local public schools is not the same for each ISD community. Texas charter schools are open enrollment with no tuition. Charter schools receive state taxpayers’ dollars but do not receive any local taxpayers’ dollars. All parents have the right to choose the type of educational environment they wish for their children.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “I believe the most pressing issues for the SBOE will continue to be writing and setting superior academic curriculum standards that are free of political agendas and activism, with the focus of preparing a highly educated society with virtues once again. Of further concern is the Permanent School Fund’s ability to guarantee school bonds.”

Tracy Fisher (D)

  • Charter Schools
    • “The impact of charters on local funding is monumental as all school funding comes from the same bucket, comprised of state and local taxes. Due to how the State has accommodated charters, they receive an average of $1150 more per student/year than public schools. Their funding comes without the accountability or oversight mandated to local schools. I will advocate for equity and accountability.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “Additional pressing issues I’ve identified for SBOE: Keep politics out of education; Implement fewer high-priority learning standards to focus on deep learning and what is essential for our kids; Respect local control to meet the needs of all kids; Maintain veto power over new charters, and gain control over charter amendments; Ensure fiscal responsibility over the permanent school fund.”

State Board of Education, District 15

Aaron Kinsey (R)

  • Why I’m Running
    • “I believe in bringing traditional values back to our schools and raising up future generations on a course for prosperity.”
  • Most Pressing Issues
    • “All children should have the opportunity to receive an education that will set them up for a positive life. I dream that future generations will have the same opportunity for prosperity as we have had. We should be teaching our children to love themselves, their families, their neighbors, their state, and their country. We need a return to a day when we were proud of America’s progress in creating a positive force for good in the world. I believe we are closer to realizing Reverend King’s dream when we focus on the things we have in common, not the ways in which we are different.”

U.S. House of Representatives District 13

Ronny Jackson (R)

  • Economy
    • “In order to safeguard our water resources, Congress should eliminate all of the red tape, regulations, and bureaucracy which hamper the development of infrastructure projects. These types of bureaucratic hurdles destroy rural America’s chances to grow and to prosper thereby causing great economic challenges. If rectified, this will allow our resources to continue to grow and to be better utilized by all people in the region.”
  • Gun safety
    • “Congress should not do anything to abridge hardworking Americans’ Second Amendment rights to lawfully keep and bear arms.”
  • Immigration
    • “To solve our broken immigration system, we must solve the crisis at our southern border. Congress can do this by increasing physical boundaries, manpower, and technology at the southern border. As such, we need to finish building the wall so that our physical boundaries do not welcome illegal immigration. Then, we need to increase funds for staff shortages at CBP and ICE. Lastly, we need to increase technology use to better monitor migration paths of illegal migrants to deter this activity.”

Kathleen Brown (D)

  • Economy
    • “Public education is key. Invest in PSA (public service announcements) to inform the public of how our fresh water supply is estimated to be depleted in less than 20 years if we don’t take measures now to address the current waste. From a federal standpoint, legislation that provides instant at point-of-sale discounts for water conservation products is the best way to incentive consumers to invest in products that will conserve water and use more green energy.”
  • Gun safety
    • “We must implement a method to identify high capacity weapons being purchased in the U.S. so that gun smuggling is tamped down. Additionally, each person should demonstrate the basic competency to possess and use a gun. The sale of bullets for high caliber guns should be limited and monitored just as psuedoephedrine, spray paint, and certain glues are regulated.”
  • Immigration
    • “A wall does not address the abject poverty, unsustainable living conditions, and dangerous environments our neighbors to the south face. While we cannot have open borders, we must reform our immigration and asylum laws with compassion and perseverance.”

Texas State Representative District 69

Walter Coppage (D)

  • Gun Safety
    • “Texas gun laws have been loosened at the urging of the NRA and other groups that are intent to carry guns of all kinds everywhere, openly. The school shooting at Uvalde exposed the myth of the ‘Good Guy With a Gun.’ I am a strong advocate of the 2nd Amendment, however the 2nd Amendment was written while muskets used round shot and bullets had not yet been invented. If we cannot come together and agree on common sense laws, we will continue to suffer losses that are heartbreaking. Raising the age to 21 for handguns and automatic weapons is reasonable. Requiring background checks is reasonable. Having Red Flag laws are reasonable. If we can’t be reasonable, we will continue to have funerals in our communities that could be avoided.”
  • Health Care
    • “Texas leads the nation in the number of people who are unable to afford to see a doctor. Rural Texas has an even higher percentage who can’t afford to see a doctor or fill a prescription. Expanding Medicaid in Texas is our best chance to bring affordable healthcare to an estimated one million Texans. Texas is one of twelve states that have failed to take advantage of expanding Medicaid. Every state surrounding Texas has adopted and implemented Medicaid Expansion. New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana have all implemented Medicaid Expansion. If Texas adopted and implemented Medicaid Expansion, it would bring in up to $10 billion in federal dollars annually to Texas. I will work to bring Medicaid Expansion to help all Texans.”

James Frank (R)

  • Gun Safety
    • “We must vigorously enforce existing laws. In every case of gun violence, perpetrators have ignored and violated multiple laws and have often done it frequently and without consequences. Yet, somehow, the answer from some corners seems to be to add more laws that will harm law-abiding citizens and harm their ability to protect themselves and their families. We should focus our efforts on full enforcement of the laws that we already have before adding more laws of questionable constitutionality and enforceability.”
  • Health Care
    • “As Americans, we pay twice as much for healthcare as other first world counties, for the same products and the same level of care. The reasons are complex but have primarily been caused by a dysfunctional partnership between both parties in DC and the huge companies who benefit from high prices. To be clear, it is not a problem with a free market, but rather the complete lack of a free market due to government intervention that prevents lower prices. I believe states starting with Texas must lead the efforts to reduce these costs which will benefit access and affordability for all 30 million Texans, including the most needy. We made great strides last year (esp on transparency). I look forward to progress on lowering costs this session.”

Michael Newmann (Lib)

  • Gun Safety
    • “The word “Gun” is an unfortunate and incorrect focal point for a much deeper and more difficult issue. Due to the nature of designed stigma around these tools the word “gun” immediately evokes base reactions that make a difficult problem appear easy to solve, it is not. A 2018 article in CBS News discussed after London’s 22 fatal stabbings they surpassed New York City’s murder rate. A problem of the heart and head. Humanity is suffering a mental health crisis, NAMI reports 1 in 5 U.S. adults suffer mental illness and 50% of mental illness begins at 14 years of age. We must begin with our school age children, passing legislation and funding that ensures there are enough trained mental health counselors to turn this tide.”
  • Health Care
    • “Open access to healthcare is vital in any successful society and it is essential that our citizens have this availability. The consequences of limited access to healthcare can be observed across any third world country and something to be avoided. The 2018 paper by Bhatt and Bathija published in Academic Medicine covering healthcare in vulnerable communities suggests that nine emerging strategies might resolve this crisis. I would promote legislation focusing on funding their four core strategies of addressing the social determinants of health access, adopting new and innovative virtual care strategies, designing global budget payments, and using inpatient/outpatient transformation strategy.”

Justice, 2nd Court of Appeals, Place 3

Elizabeth Kerr (R)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “The State Bar of Texas and our local bar associations have for a number of years stepped up their pro bono work on behalf of underserved groups. The help that’s available from volunteers could be better publicized, perhaps, so that people know it’s there, but Texas lawyers are and have been incredibly generous with their time and talent.”
  • Campaign Donations
    • “I have nearly six years’ experience in this position, and not once have campaign contributions swayed my decisions. Also, the fact that attorneys from both sides of the docket and from both large and small firms have chosen to contribute to my campaign should assure voters that my peers trust in my integrity and fairness. I will never decide a case based on anything but the law.”

Delonia A. Watson (D)

  • Ensuring Equity
    • “It is important that those who are underserved see others who look like them working in the justice system so that they believe that the system will work for them. I also believe that the system needs to be reviewed by folks who have diversified backgrounds who may see obstacles that are not apparent to others.”
  • Campaign Donations
    • “All candidates are required to file public financial reports that detail campaign donations. I encourage voters to review those reports to see which candidates receive what and from whom.”

County Judge

Janaye Evans (D)

  • County Offices Security
    • “A top priority of mine is to make sure all of the Wichita County courts have security. There is absolutely no reason why any court facility should ever be without well-trained police officers.”
  • Highest Priorities
    • “My top priorities I plan to focus on will be first, handling any cases that may be “overdue”, next will be to address any in-house concerns from all of the Wichita County employees. I also want to modify the way the public is involved in deciding what the county budget is spent on so we all feel better on where our tax money goes, stop any issues the majority of the Wichita County employees may have, and start helping everyone (employee or customer) feel as if we are a family and not just working for a paycheck (I’m not saying they aren’t but I know sometimes I walked into the Clerk’s office and felt like I didn’t belong). That’s not how I want the anyone to feel. I want Wichita County to grow in all areas. It starts from within.”

Jim Johnson (R)

  • County Offices Security
    • “It is always going to be a priority to ensure that communication channels between the employees at the outlying offices and local law enforcement are open and effective. I also believe that ensuring county residents know that their elected officials are available and responsive to concerns helps avoid potential problems and protects front-line employees. If there are specific security worries, I would stand ready to address those specific issues and work with the Commissioner’s Court to address them.”
  • Highest Priorities
    • “My highest priority will be making sure core functions of county government–law enforcement, maintenance of roads & bridges, and a well-functioning courthouse–are done with excellence. This means adequate funding, great customer-service minded staff, and always keeping in mind those we serve. One of my biggest concerns is that most people have lost trust in the institutions of American society, including government at all levels. It is one of my highest priorities to help rebuild that trust by ensuring that county government is transparent and responsive to those it serves. I can help accomplish this by effectively communicating with residents and ensuring they know that their voice is heard and matters.”

Judge, County Court-at-Law No. 1 (Unopposed)

Gary Butler (R)

Judge, County Court-at-Law No. 2 (Unopposed)

Greg King (R)

District Clerk (Unopposed)

Leslee Mannon (R)

County Clerk (Unopposed)

Annette Stanley (R)

County Treasurer (Unopposed)

Stephen Jones (R)

WFISD School Board at Large

Sandy Camp (Nonpartisan)

  • Top Issues facing WFISD
    • “I would consider student achievement and the teacher shortage to be our top two issues. Although, school safety and budget are right there among them. Parents want their kids to go to top rated school districts and WFISD has always out performed the state, but we can do better. I feel the community has lost some trust because they feel they can get a better education elsewhere . As a district, we need to get back to focusing on academics. I believe when we do, not only will we build back that trust, but teachers will want to work for us. We have to show our educators that they have the support they need to enable them to do their jobs. WFISD should be a PREMIER district in North Texas and together, we can make it happen!”
  • Budgetary Issues/Solutions
    • “Getting the budget balanced this year [is the most pressing matter]! I want to say, just by reducing the amount of administration in central office has helped, but we have a long way to go. We don’t need to be spending money that isn’t already allocated in the general fund. We need to say “no” to some of the programs the district has initiated over the past several years. Instead, allocate money to pay for tutors and support staff to help with academic achievement. We need to utilize grants for technology and other areas. We need to get our students back into our schools! Our enrollment has plummeted over the last several years. Most importantly, we need to get back to spending our tax payers money on what it is supposed to be paying for – TO EDUCATE OUR KIDS!”

Mark Hood (Nonpartisan)

  • Top Issues facing WFISD
    • “The top issue facing the WFISD is financial mismanagement. The lack of the ISD’s ability to effectively budget and stay within the budget they set has caused the community to lose trust with the WFISD and its board of trustees. Moving forward, the school board must have a more active and public role in the budgeting process. I believe the financial issues of the ISD have led to the second issue which is student and teacher retention. I think the inability of the ISD to maintain proper teacher support has caused teachers to leave for retirement and/or other districts who do offer greater support and accountability. Students have also left for outlying Region IX districts that provide smaller classes and safer learning environments.”
  • Budgetary Issues/Solutions
    • “The most pressing budgetary issue has been the inability of the WFISD to effectively construct and carry out an annual budget. This past year, the WFISD had an operating budget deficit of approximately $9 million. This equates to $750,000 every month operating in the red. No business or household can continue to operate like this and succeed. This budget deficit has hindered the WFISD’s ability to effectively support its’ teachers, students, and staff. This operating deficit has also had a negative impact on the districts Rainy Day Fund. Sadly, the 2021-22 budget deficit will be felt for more years to come until the budget gets balanced.”

WFISD School Board District 1 (Unopposed)

Susan Grisel (NonPartisan)

  • Top Priorities
    • Every child in WFISD deserves the best education possible to prepare them academically and socially for the future
    • Our teachers deserve to be supported and appreciated
    • Our taxpayers deserve wise and transparent use of their tax dollars

WFISD School Board District 3 (Unopposed)

Mark Lukert (NonPartisan)

WFISD School Board District 5

Tom Bursey (NonPartisan)

  • Top Issues facing WFISD
    • “Getting the district’s finances back in order is a priority after the problem created by our previous Superintendent and CFO. Getting Principals and Teachers to put their trust in the new Superintendent and administrative staff.”
  • Budgetary Issues/Solutions
    • “I believe buses and their routes, salaries and stipends, maintenance of facilities and meals for students deserve budget attention.”

Jim Johnson (NonPartisan)

  • Top Issues facing WFISD
    • “First is the safety of every student that comes onto a campus, attends a school event, and is involved in school sponsored activities. Threats come from both inside and outside the walls of our schools and it’s the responsibility of the staff, with encouragement from the Board, to diligently find solutions to these risks. Second is student performance. The District was recently given an overall grade of B, but too many campus level grades fall below this average. If our core mission is to educate and prepare every student for the challenges they will face when they graduate, we are still coming up short. Good enough isn’t good enough. It starts with the Board to set an expectation of excellence.”
  • Budgetary Issues/Solutions
    • “Our district has been operating with a budget deficit for far too long. A rational assessment of our financial situation and constructive solutions are required with each vote the Board takes having a budget impact. However, this issue is circular. We can’t fix the budget until we’ve restored the bonds of trust between all the stakeholders. And we can’t build that trust without getting control of the budget.”

All responses by candidates come from vote411.com, the League of Women Voters of Texas, and individual candidate’s homepages.

You Might Like

Articles You May Like

Americans Are Disgusted by Republican Inaction on Mass Shootings
FPC Files for Injunction Against Delaware “Assault Weapons” Ban
DeepMedia Partners With Department of Defense on Deepfake Detection and Translation Tools, Receives Phase 1 SBIR Funding
A Republican super PAC run by former NRA executives lost more than $158,000 in an email hack, federal records show
Biden and Democrats use ‘assault weapons ban’ to position for 2024

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *