Trump trial live updates: Ex-president insults judge in courtroom rant

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Closing arguments are underway in a New York court for the civil business fraud trial of former President Donald Trump; two of his sons; and their company, the Trump Organization.

New York Attorney General Letitia James accuses Trump and the other defendants of scheming to falsely inflate the stated values of more than a dozen real estate assets listed on his annual statements of financial condition to reap “hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten gains” from better loan terms.

James has asked Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron to fine Trump $370 million, ban him from the state’s real estate industry for life and bar him from serving as the officer or director of a New York corporation.

The attorney general also wants his sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, banned from the state’s real estate industry for five years.

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Trump had planned to make some of the defense’s closing arguments, according to his lawyer, but Engoron on Wednesday barred him from doing so as Trump’s attorney refused to confirm the former president would comply with restrictions on what he would be allowed to say.

Trump, who is the front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination, denies any wrongdoing in the case and claims he is the victim of a politically motivated persecution by James, a Democrat.

The trial, which did not have a jury, has spanned 44 days.

Engoron is expected to issue his verdict in the case in the coming weeks.

‘Outrageous!’ Trump lawyer objects to ‘Murderer’s Row’ jibe by AG attorney

(L-R) Waite Hoyt, Babe Ruth, Huggins, Miller Huggins, Bob Meusel, and Bob Shawkey pose for a photo at Yankee Stadium in New York City in 1927.

Transcendental Graphics | Getty Images

(L-R) Waite Hoyt, Babe Ruth, Huggins, Miller Huggins, Bob Meusel, and Bob Shawkey pose for a photo at Yankee Stadium in New York City in 1927.

Trump’s lawyer Chris Kise went ballistic after a lawyer for the attorney general’s office quipped that Trump’s team had called a “Murderer’s Row of experts” as witnesses at trial.

“This is a Murderer’s Row?!” Kise fumed as he objected to AG lawyer Kevin Wallace’s characterization.

“You talk about me and my client like that? This is outrageous!” Kise exclaimed.

Wallace replied, “Chris, stop!”

Judge Engoron then asked Wallace if he was really accusing Trump’s experts of murder.

Wallace replied that he was merely using a baseball term for a particularly skillful lineup of hitters.

The term “Murderers Row” is commonly used to refer to the 1927 New York Yankees — which featured Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Earle Combs, Bob Meusel and Tony Lazzeri — and won the World Series in four straight games.

– Dan Mangan

‘We had already lost’ before trial began, Trump lawyer says

Former president Donald Trump's lawyer Alina Habba arrives to New York State Supreme Court for the start of the civil fraud trial against Trump on Oct. 2, 2023.

Kena Betancur | AFP | Getty Images

Former president Donald Trump’s lawyer Alina Habba arrives to New York State Supreme Court for the start of the civil fraud trial against Trump on Oct. 2, 2023.

Trump attorney Alina Habba railed against Judge Arthur Engoron for ruling that the former president was liable for fraud before the trial even began.

“Let’s remember that, before I walked into court, we had already lost,” Habba said at a press conference after leaving the court before lawyers for the attorney general’s office began their closing arguments.

“That was clear with his motion for summary judgment,” Habba said, “before witnesses, before experts.”

Indeed, Engoron in a pretrial ruling found Trump, his company and other defendants liable for fraudulently misstating the values of his real estate holdings and other assets for multiple years.

The trial is being conducted to determine damages and resolve remaining claims in Attorney General Letitia James’ lawsuit. Trump’s attorneys tried numerous times during the trial to scrap the case, but the judge rejected them all.

Kevin Breuninger

Attorney general’s lawyer begins closing argument

Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in the courtroom during his civil fraud trial at New York Supreme Court in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Jefferson Siegel | Getty Images

Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in the courtroom during his civil fraud trial at New York Supreme Court in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

A lawyer for the New York Attorney General’s Office began his closing argument by dismissing what he called “the same arguments from the defense” that have long been raised by Trump’s attorneys.

“Valuations are subjective, Donald Trump is rich and banks like rich people,” lawyer Kevin Wallace said, summarizing Trump’s claims. “Some of those arguments have already been rejected by this court on summary judgment.”

“We have not heard any new facts, because most of the facts are undisputed,” Wallace said. “They cannot argue that [Trump’s Trump Tower] triplex is 30,000 square feet, Mar-a-Lago is a private residence and Trump Park Avenue is rent-regulated.”

Wallace also said Trump’s annual statements of financial condition “were false every year” between 2011 and 2021 “by over a billion dollars.”

“Were they acting with intent when they manipulated their annual financial statements as part of a conspiracy?” Wallace asked about the defendants. “Did they know it? And the answer is yes.”

— Dan Mangan

Trump sons’ lawyer: ‘This is a press release wrapped up in a lawsuit’

Donald Trump Jr. and his brother Eric Trump arrive at New York Supreme Court for former President Donald Trump's civil fraud trial in New York City on Nov. 2, 2023.

David Dee Delgado | Getty Images

Donald Trump Jr. and his brother Eric Trump arrive at New York Supreme Court for former President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial in New York City on Nov. 2, 2023.

A lawyer for Donald Trump’s two eldest sons argued there is no evidence that they did anything wrong.

“There is no case, there is nothing there,” said Cliff Robert, the attorney for Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump.

“This is a press release wrapped up in a lawsuit,” Robert said of the attorney general’s claims.

Robert also said the sons “have their futures ahead of them” and that “there are thousands of employees relying on Eric and Don with their hands on the wheel to make sure the company runs well.”

— Dan Mangan

Allowed to speak in court, Trump argues with judge and rants about attorney general

Former U.S. president Donald Trump gives brief closing arguments while seated at the defense table in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S., January 11, 2024 in this courtroom sketch. 

Jane Rosenberg | Reuters

Former U.S. president Donald Trump gives brief closing arguments while seated at the defense table in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S., January 11, 2024 in this courtroom sketch. 

Speaking up in the courtroom during closing arguments, Trump just insulted Judge Arthur Engoron directly and claimed he was being politically targeted.

“I am an innocent man, persecuted by someone running for office,” Trump said. “This is interference.”

“They found nothing and now they want $370 million, for what?” Trump asked. “I borrowed money from the bank because they wanted me to … they made money.”

“I know this is boring to you,” Trump then said directly to Engoron. “I know you have your own agenda; you can’t listen for more than one minute…”

Engoron had previously rejected Trump’s bid to personally deliver some closing arguments because his lawyer would not agree to limitations on what Trump could say.

But after the attorney, Chris Kise, asked the judge in court to grant Trump some time to speak, Engoron permitted the former president five minutes — on the condition that he focus on the facts.

Kevin Breuninger

Trump claims ‘out of control’ attorney general will spur more companies to leave New York

Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Shannon Stapleton | Reuters

Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Donald Trump claimed that other New York-based companies will seek to do business in more hospitable states after seeing how Attorney General Letitia James has pursued him in his civil fraud trial.

“It’s a shame, I think she should be criminally liable for this,” Trump said outside the courtroom during a break in the proceedings. “This is out of control.”

He claimed, “she did this to Exxon,” prompting the oil giant to relocate to Texas and costing New York billions of dollars in taxes.

He was possibly referring to past litigation between Exxon and the attorney general’s office, which involved an investigation into whether the company misled investors about its knowledge of climate change.

“I think we should be entitled to damages,” Trump said.

Kevin Breuninger

Trump campaign fundraises off fraud trial as ex-president sits in court

Former U.S. President and 2024 Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump arrives to speak during a town hall in Des Moines, Iowa, on Jan. 10, 2024.

Kamil Krzaczynski | Afp | Getty Images

Former U.S. President and 2024 Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump arrives to speak during a town hall in Des Moines, Iowa, on Jan. 10, 2024.

Donald Trump is once again seizing on his New York fraud trial proceedings to stoke his supporters’ outrage and motivate them to donate money to his 2024 presidential campaign.

His latest email appeal claims Attorney General Letitia James is “asking the Democrat judge to force me to pay $370 MILLION and to BAN ME FOR LIFE from practicing real estate in the state I helped build.”

The email insists that Trump is not asking for contributions to help him pay the potentially massive fine.

Rather, I am asking for you to make a contribution today to SAVE OUR COUNTRY from the evil and incompetent people who are letting it burn to the ground,” he writes.

Kevin Breuninger

Trump ‘has one of the strongest balance sheets you have ever seen’: lawyer

Former U.S. President Donald Trump departs after a brief press conference at a hotel, following his hearing at District Court on Trump's claim of immunity in the federal case accusing him of illegally attempting to overturn his 2020 election defeat, in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 9, 2024.

Nathan Howard | Reuters

Former U.S. President Donald Trump departs after a brief press conference at a hotel, following his hearing at District Court on Trump’s claim of immunity in the federal case accusing him of illegally attempting to overturn his 2020 election defeat, in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 9, 2024.

Donald Trump’s lawyer is arguing that the former president is so rich that the inaccurate annual financial statements Trump gave to prospective lenders had no effect on their decisions to loan the Trump Organization money against its real estate assets.

“President Trump has one of the strongest personal balance sheets you have ever seen,” attorney Chris Kise said. “That is what is material to them, not the annual financial statements.”

Kise also argued that a bank “determines what is material” to their decision to lend money to Trump.

“Not the attorney general or court,” he added.

— Dan Mangan

‘Evidence of harm’ not a requirement to decide Trump penalty fines, judge says

Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Shannon Stapleton | Reuters

Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Judge Arthur Engoron rejected the argument by Donald Trump’s lawyer that the former president and his company should not be penalized unless the attorney general can prove lenders lost money.

“If you do something wrong, you are supposed to disgorge those profits,” the judge said. “You talk about damage, or harm … there does not have to be evidence of harm,” said Engoron.

The lawyer, Chris Kise, called the attorney general’s disgorgement claim “total speculation,” arguing that Trump’s lenders did not suffer monetary losses.

— Dan Mangan

Attorney general’s $370 million penalty request based on ‘total speculation,’ Trump lawyer says

New York Attorney General Letitia James sits in New York State Supreme Court during the civil fraud trial against the Trump Organization, in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Seth Wenig | AFP | Getty Images

New York Attorney General Letitia James sits in New York State Supreme Court during the civil fraud trial against the Trump Organization, in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

The $370 million fine that Attorney General Letitia James wants a judge to impose on Donald Trump as part of the penalty in his fraud case is “based on total speculation,” defense lawyer Chris Kise is arguing.

Kise has argued that there is no evidence the inaccurate financial statements that Trump used to help obtain bank loans resulted in his receiving money that he otherwise wouldn’t have received.

Kise argued that ill-gotten gains are a requirement for a disgorgement penalty, a term for giving up money made as a result of wrongdoing.

Kevin Breuninger

‘I don’t have to accept testimony if I don’t think it’s credible,’ judge tells Trump lawyer

Judge Arthur Engoron speaks during the trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump for Trump's civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in New York City on Oct. 3, 2023.

Shannon Stapleton | Getty Images

Judge Arthur Engoron speaks during the trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump for Trump’s civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in New York City on Oct. 3, 2023.

Judge Arthur Engoron hinted he might not believe the testimony that Trump’s witnesses gave during the trial, even if it had not been directly rebutted by witnesses or evidence presented by the attorney general’s team.

“You keep talking about unrebutted testimony,” Engoron said to Trump lawyer Chris Kise during a pause in oral arguments.

“I don’t have to accept testimony if I don’t think it’s credible,” said Engoron.

— Dan Mangan

Trump trial draws protestors to Manhattan courthouse

Protestors block traffic ahead of former U.S. President Donald Trump's civil fraud trial at New York Supreme Court in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Michael M. Santiago | Getty Images

Protestors block traffic ahead of former U.S. President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial at New York Supreme Court in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Protestors opposed to Donald Trump are gathered outside the courthouse in lower Manhattan, some of them carrying a sign saying, “No Dictators in the USA.”

“Thank you Tish!,” some of the demonstrators chanted, referring to New York Attorney General Letitia “Tish” James, whose fraud lawsuit against Trump is the subject of the trial.

The demonstration has blocked some traffic around the Supreme Court building.

— Dan Mangan

Trump had ‘no motive’ to inflate his wealth, defense attorney argues

In this courtroom sketch, Judge Arthur Engoron listens to Trump's lawyer Chris Kise during a hearing related to New York Attorney General Letitia James' civil lawsuit alleging that former U.S. President Donald Trump ran a systematic fraud at his family business, at a courthouse in New York on Sept. 22, 2023.

Jane Rosenberg | Reuters

In this courtroom sketch, Judge Arthur Engoron listens to Trump’s lawyer Chris Kise during a hearing related to New York Attorney General Letitia James’ civil lawsuit alleging that former U.S. President Donald Trump ran a systematic fraud at his family business, at a courthouse in New York on Sept. 22, 2023.

Defense lawyer Chris Kise argued that Donald Trump had “no motive” to lie about his wealth and asset values on his financial records because he already had a “proven track record” in the commercial real estate industry.

Deutsche Bank’s Private Wealth Management division “rolled out the red carpet” for Trump, a major client, so there was no reason for him to change his financial numbers, Kise said.

He added that it is “unrebutted” that the records, known as statements of financial condition, did not affect Trump’s loan terms.

The attorney general’s office alleges Trump used false and misleading statements for a variety of financial benefits, including helping to secure a $170 million loan from Deutsche Bank on much more favorable terms than he would have otherwise.

Kevin Breuninger

‘I want to speak’: Trump slams judge who refused to let him make closing arguments

Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on the day he attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

David Dee Delgado | Reuters

Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on the day he attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Before entering the courtroom, Donald Trump slammed Judge Arthur Engoron for refusing to let him personally deliver some of the closing arguments in his business fraud trial.

“I want to speak, I want to make the summation,” Trump said.

Engoron rejected a request by Trump’s lawyer to let the former president speak in Thursday’s proceedings because Trump would not agree to limitations on what he could say.

“At this moment, the judge is not letting me make the summation because I’ll bring up things that he doesn’t want to hear,” Trump said, adding, “It’s a very unfair trial.”

Trump teased a news conference sometime later in the day on Wall Street.

Kevin Breuninger

Trump lawyer argues no witness ‘said there was fraud’

Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits at the New York State Supreme Court during the civil fraud trial against the Trump Organization in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Shannon Stapleton | AFP | Getty Images

Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits at the New York State Supreme Court during the civil fraud trial against the Trump Organization in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Trump lawyer Chris Kise opened his closing argument by saying, “not one witness over a three-year investigation, a year of litigation and 44 days of trial … said there was fraud.”

“The entire case is a manufactured claim to pursue a political agenda,” Kise said.

The lawyer also argued that none of Trump’s lenders had claimed to have suffered financially as a result of his alleged improper valuation of his real estate assets.

— Dan Mangan

Here’s how the closing arguments will be delivered

Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in New York State Supreme Court during his civil fraud trial in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Michael M. Santiago | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in New York State Supreme Court during his civil fraud trial in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Trump’s lawyers will be the first to deliver their closing arguments.

Attorneys Chris Kise, Alina Habba and Cliff Robert will speak in that order for the defendants. Their arguments are expected to last approximately two hours.

The prosecution will follow, with Kevin Wallace and Andy Amer delivering arguments. They are expected to speak for less than two hours.

Kevin Breuninger

Eric Trump at closing arguments, with Trump lawyer Epshteyn

Former U.S. President Donald Trump's son and co-defendant Eric Trump attends the Trump Organization civil fraud trial, in New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Nov. 3, 2023.

Pool | Via Reuters

Former U.S. President Donald Trump’s son and co-defendant Eric Trump attends the Trump Organization civil fraud trial, in New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Nov. 3, 2023.

Donald Trump’s son Eric Trump, who is also a defendant in the trial, is in the courtroom.

Eric is sitting next to Boris Epshteyn, a lawyer for Trump.

Epshteyn is on probation after having pled guilty recently to disorderly conduct and fighting in connection with a conflict at a bar in Scottsdale, Arizona. It was the second time in seven years that he had been charged in such an incident.

Also in court is longtime Trump lawyer Alan Garten.

— Dan Mangan

NRA and former chief Wayne LaPierre on trial steps away from Trump

Former NRA chief Wayne LaPierre, center, arrives for his civil trial at the New York State Supreme Court in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Michael M. Santiago | Getty Images

Former NRA chief Wayne LaPierre, center, arrives for his civil trial at the New York State Supreme Court in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Former National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre is also on trial today in the New York State Supreme Court building in Lower Manhattan, steps away from Trump.

A lawsuit brought by New York Attorney General Letitia James — whose office also brought the business fraud case against Trump — alleges that the NRA defendants broke nonprofit laws and misused millions of dollars to fund lavish personal expenditures.

LaPierre announced last week that he would resign from the NRA at the end of the month.

Kevin Breuninger

Attorney general seeking $370 million in fines, lifetime NY real estate ban for Trump

The Trump Tower in New York on Oct. 1, 2023.

Yuki Iwamura | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The Trump Tower in New York on Oct. 1, 2023.

New York Attorney General Letitia James is asking that Trump be fined $370 million in the case and banned for life from the state’s real estate industry.

James also wants Trump banned from serving as an officer or director of a corporation in New York.

The attorney general wants five-year bans for two of Trump’s sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, from the New York real estate business.

James is seated in the courtroom for today’s closing arguments, although she is not scheduled to speak.

— Dan Mangan

Engoron is third Trump trial figure in three weeks to be swatted

Judge Arthur Engoron presides over former U.S. President Donald Trump's civil fraud case in New York on Oct. 17, 2023.

Andrew Kelly | Reuters

Judge Arthur Engoron presides over former U.S. President Donald Trump’s civil fraud case in New York on Oct. 17, 2023.

The swatting email that targeted Judge Arthur Engoron’s home early Thursday is the third time in three weeks that a key player in a Trump legal case has been the victim of a swatting attempt.

On Christmas Day, someone called police to report that Special Counsel Jack Smith had shot his wife, prompting a law enforcement response to the couple’s Montgomery County, Maryland, home.

When police got close to the home, federal officers already assigned to protect Smith informed them that it was a hoax.

Smith is prosecuting Trump in two criminal cases. In Florida federal court, Smith alleges Trump hoarded and hid hundreds of classified government documents after he left the White House.

In U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., Smith has charged Trump with crimes related to his effort to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

On Sunday, the D.C. home of Judge Tanya Chutkan was targeted in a swatting attempt. Chutkan is presiding over the election case against Trump that Smith is prosecuting.

— Christina Wilkie

Courthouse tightens security after swatting incident at judge’s home

General view of the New York State Supreme Court ahead of the Trump Organization civil fraud trial in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Charly Triballeau | Afp | Getty Images

General view of the New York State Supreme Court ahead of the Trump Organization civil fraud trial in New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Security is being tightened at the New York courthouse where the closing arguments are set to take place in response to a swatting incident targeting the judge’s home, a court spokesman told CNBC.

The security protocols that have been in place since the start of Trump’s trial are being increased “out of an abundance of caution,” and due to concerns about Judge Arthur Engoron’s safety, the spokesman said.

The spokesman, Al Baker of the New York State Office of Court Administration, declined to detail the additional security measures but described them as” thoughtful, comprehensive and flexible.”

Baker said the court proceedings were expected to continue on schedule Thursday morning.

Kevin Breuninger

Trump arrives at closing arguments despite being barred from speaking in them

Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Shannon Stapleton | Reuters

Former U.S. President Donald Trump attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York City on Jan. 11, 2024.

Trump arrived at Manhattan Supreme Court moments ago for the closing arguments of his business fraud trial — even though his request to deliver some of those arguments was denied.

Trump said on social media on Wednesday that he was being “forced” to travel to New York from Iowa, where he participated in a Fox News town hall, to attend the arguments. He is not required to be there in person.

The all-caps post on Truth Social attacked Judge Arthur Engoron and New York Attorney General Letitia James as he lamented that he “would like to personally do the closing argument on the civil trial.”

Engoron on Wednesday rejected a defense attorney’s request to allow Trump to personally deliver some of the closing argument because they would not agree to limitations on what he could say.

Kevin Breuninger

NY AG: Trump is not above the law ‘no matter how rich or powerful you pretend to be’

New York Attorney General Letitia James walks outside during a lunch break as the trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump, his adult sons, the Trump Organization and others in a civil fraud case continues, in New York City on Oct. 3, 2023.

Eduardo Munoz | Reuters

New York Attorney General Letitia James walks outside during a lunch break as the trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump, his adult sons, the Trump Organization and others in a civil fraud case continues, in New York City on Oct. 3, 2023.

New York Attorney General Letitia James sent a shot across the bow at Trump before her office presents closing arguments in the fraud trial.

“For years, Donald Trump engaged in significant financial fraud to enrich himself and his family,” James wrote on X, formerly known as Twitter, on Thursday morning.

“No matter how rich or powerful you pretend to be, no one is above the law,” she said.

— Kevin Breuninger

Judge’s home targeted in ‘swatting incident’ hours before closing arguments, police say

Judge Arthur Engoron is seen in the courtroom before the start of former U.S. President Donald Trump’s civil business fraud trial at the State Supreme Court building in New York on Oct. 4, 2023.

Pool | Via Reuters

Judge Arthur Engoron is seen in the courtroom before the start of former U.S. President Donald Trump’s civil business fraud trial at the State Supreme Court building in New York on Oct. 4, 2023.

Judge Arthur Engoron was targeted in a “swatting incident” that sent police to his Long Island home just hours before he was set to hear closing arguments in Trump’s fraud case, cops confirmed to CNBC.

An individual sent a threatening email to a local Long Island news outlet, which then called it in to the Nassau County Police Department around 5:30 a.m. ET, police said.

Police would not share details of the email. NBC News and other outlets have reported there was a bomb threat made to Engoron’s home.

No threats have been located but an active investigation remains underway, police said.

— Kevin Breuninger

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