Supreme Court Grants Cert Petition in FPC-Supported Case Challenging New York Carry Restrictions

Gun News

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 26, 2021) — Today, Firearms Policy Coalition (FPC) announced the grant of a petition for certiorari (review) in the FPC and Firearms Policy Foundation (FPF)-supported right-to-carry case NYSRPA v. Bruen (originally captioned as NYSRPA v. Corlett). In January, FPC and FPF filed a brief urging the Court to take the case and restore the right to bear arms in public. The brief can be viewed at FPCLegal.org.

In granting the petition, the Court limited the question presented to: “Whether the State’s denial of petitioners’ applications for concealed-carry licenses for self-defense violated the Second Amendment.” In comparison, the question presented in the cert petition was: “Whether the Second Amendment allows the government to prohibit ordinary law-abiding citizens from carrying handguns outside the home for self-defense.” 

While it’s impossible to predict how the court will rule in NYSRPA v. Bruen, it’s clear that the outcome of this case will have a significant and wide-ranging impact on the right to keep and bear arms.

“The Supreme Court’s taking this case is an encouraging sign that it may begin to address the scope of the right to bear arms outside of the home, as well as the mode of analysis that lower courts should apply when reviewing Second Amendment cases,” said Adam Kraut, FPC’s Senior Director of Legal Operations. “As we argued to the Court in our brief, it is time to restore the Second Amendment’s first-class right status and put an end to lower courts’ unfavorable treatment of this fundamental human right.”

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FPC is currently litigating right-to-carry cases in many jurisdictions, including New Jersey, New York City, and others, with more lawsuits actively being prepared for filing. Firearms Policy Coalition and its FPC Law team are the nation’s next-generation advocates leading the Second Amendment litigation and research space. Some FPC legal actions include:

  • A challenge to Tennessee’s ban on handgun carry by adults under 21 (Basset v. Slatery)
  • A challenge to Maryland’s ban on handgun carry (Call v. Jones
  • A challenge to New Jersey’s ban on handgun carry (Bennett v. Davis)
  • A challenge to New York City’s ban on handgun carry (Greco v. New York City)
  • A challenge to Pennsylvania’s ban on handgun carry by adults under 21 (Lara v. Evanchick)
  • A challenge to the federal ban on the sale of handguns and handgun ammunition to adults under 21 years of age (Reese v. ATF)
  • A challenge to Maryland’s ban on so-called “assault weapons” (Bianchi v. Frosh)
  • Challenge to California’s ban on so-called “assault weapons” (Miller v. Calif. Att’y General
  • A challenge to California’s handgun “roster”, microstamping, and self-manufacturing ban laws (Renna v. Becerra)
  • A challenge to Pennsylvania’s laws completely denying the right to carry to individuals who were previously granted relief from prior non-violent convictions and are not currently prohibited from possessing firearms (Suarez v. Evanchick)

For more on these cases and other legal action initiatives, visit FPCLegal.org and follow FPC on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube.

Firearms Policy Coalition (firearmspolicy.org) is a 501(c)4 nonprofit organization. FPC’s mission is to protect and defend constitutional rights—especially the right to keep and bear arms—advance individual liberty, and restore freedom through litigation and legal action, legislative and regulatory action, education, outreach, grassroots activism, and other programs. FPC Law is the nation’s largest public interest legal team focused on Second Amendment and adjacent fundamental rights including freedom of speech and due process, conducting litigation, research, scholarly publications, and amicus briefing, among other efforts.

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